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Adult education is a human right to be exercised by all. The case for adult learning and education corresponds to the case for lifelong learning: throughout the world, education is the indispensable foundation for creating and sustaining personal, social and economic well-being. Today, this is a lifelong and life-wide agenda both for empowerment and for the development of human resources. These two pillars bear equal weight; only together can they work effectively. Their combined impact can improve the quality of life for all citizens around the globe, generating and developing to the...

Author/Editor:
UIL
Year of publication:
2008

Available from UIL's Library in English, French, Spanish, Chinese, Russian, Arabic.

Literacy Initiative for Empowerment (LIFE)

The Literacy Initiative for Empowerment (LIFE) was conceived as a ten-year (2006-2015) strategic framework through which national governments, NGOs, civil society, the private sector, UN agencies, and bilateral and multilateral agencies collectively advanced literacy efforts in thirty-five countries where illiteracy posed a critical challenge. As a key operational mechanism for the implementation of the United Nations Literacy Decade (UNLD, 2003-2012), which was led and coordinated by UNESCO, LIFE aimed to support countries in achieving a fifty...

Author/Editor:
UIL
Year of publication:
2008

Available from UIL's Library in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Portuguese.

This study of the financing for promoting literacy in Senegal aims to provide a summary of the available reports on this question in order to:

-Compare the costs of different programmes implemented in Senegal.

-Make recommendations for the calculation of the cost of a national programme, providing quality whilst remaining within the country’s capacities.

-Draw conclusions for planning the LIFE initiative and developing a regional strategy for the UNLD.

Download: Case...

Author/Editor:
Diagne; Amadou Wade
Year of publication:
2007

Available from UIL's Library in English, French.

This study has been prepared for the African Inter-Ministerial Conference on Literacy, which is due to be held in September 2007. The main purpose of the paper is to analyse the costs of a range of successful literacy programmes, run by government ministries and international and national non-governmental organisations. The intention is to add to the limited amount of data on costs currently available, and provide broad recommendations regarding their calculation, to inform the planning for LIFE and the regional strategy for the UNLD.

Download:...

Author/Editor:
Carr-Hill; Roy; Roberts; Fiona
Year of publication:
2007

Available from UIL's Library in English, French.

The Education for All Global Assessment Report pointed out that only 5% of primary school students in Africa have attained the minimal level of competency which should be acquired by the end of primary school. Based on this, the need for creating and sustaining alternative education systems and approaches is painfully evident. However, funding for alternative forms of education is dismally low. In most countries, government funding for “out-of-school” education programs is usually less than 1% of their education budget. This is the niche for non-formal education and literacy...

Author/Editor:
Fagerberg-Diallo; Sonja
Year of publication:
2007

Available from UIL's Library in English, French.

The aim of this report commissioned by the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning (UIL) is to test and apply our approach and the normative model in Brazil, Burkina Faso and Uganda. The three countries are multilingual in various degrees, and differ in terms of educational development, literate environment and socio-economic development.

Download: The Costs and the funding of non formal literacy programmes in Brazil, Burkina Faso and Uganda (PDF 568 kb)

Author/Editor:
Ravens; Jan van; Aggio; Carlos
Year of publication:
2007

Available from UIL's Library in English, French.

The year 2006 was another milestone in the transformation of the institute. At the end of June 2006 the UNESCO institute for Education (UIE), which was established in 1951/52 as a foundation under German law, closed down. The 174 th session of UNESCO’s Executive Board – following the recommendation of the Director-General- decided to turn the institute into a body under international law and to give it a new name, the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning (UIL). This was a historic moment in the life of the Institute. The name change was recommended during a process of external evaluation...

Author/Editor:
UIL
Year of publication:
2006

Available from UIL's Library in English, French.

It is now foreseeable that 2005 was the last full year in which the UNESCO Institute for Education operated under its legal form as a German foundation. The 33rd General Conference of UNESCO has removed the last hurdle for the transformation of the Institute into a full-fledged international body. The decision to change the statutes of the Institute had been taken already in 2003 by the UNESCO Executive Board following a recommendation by the Director-General. The change will now be carried out in early 2006. In 2005 UIE made a big step forward towards being a more integral part of UNESCO...

Author/Editor:
UIE
Year of publication:
2005

Available from UIL's Library in English.

In 2003, the Executive Board of UNESCO decided that the status and statutes of the UNESCO Institute for Education should be changed in order to make it a full-fledged international institute. Although the Host-country Agreement between UNESCO and the German Government – which is the decisive step towards the new international status of UIE – has not yet been concluded, the Institute has made in the past year great efforts to adapt to the new situation. A considerable attempt was made by UNESCO to integrate more organically UIE and other Education Institutes and Centres into the Education...

Author/Editor:
UIE
Year of publication:
2005

Available from UIL's Library in English, French.

The Fifth International Conference on Adult Education (CONFINTEA V), held in 1997, looked ahead to the world’s transition to the new millennium by identifyin adult learning as a key to the twenty-first century. The Hamburg Declaration on Adult Learning adopted there forcefully expresses the vital significance of adult education and learning by identifying its potential “for fostering ecologically sustainable development, for promoting democracy, justice, gender equity, and scientific, social and economic development, and for building a world in which violent conflict is...

Author/Editor:
International Conference on Adult Education; 5th; Hamburg; Germany; 1997
Year of publication:
2004

Available from UIL's Library in English, French, Spanish.