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This report constitutes the Arab region’s main input into the CONFINTEA Mid-Term Review process. It is also an attempt at a critical assessment of the progress made since the Fifth International Conference on Adult Education (CONFINTEA), which took place in Hamburg in July 1997, and the Arab Regional Preparatory Conference, which took place in Cairo in February of that year.

Download: Literacy and adult education in the Arab World: regional report for the CONFINTEA V Mid-Term Review Conference, Bangkok, September 2003 (PDF 202 KB)

Literacy Initiative for Empowerment (LIFE)

The Literacy Initiative for Empowerment (LIFE) was conceived as a ten-year (2006-2015) strategic framework through which national governments, NGOs, civil society, the private sector, UN agencies, and bilateral and multilateral agencies collectively advanced literacy efforts in thirty-five countries where illiteracy posed a critical challenge. As a key operational mechanism for the implementation of the United Nations Literacy Decade (UNLD, 2003-2012), which was led and coordinated by UNESCO, LIFE aimed to support countries in achieving a fifty per cent improvement in their adult literacy rates by 2015.

LIFE is

  • a framework of collaborative action for enhancing and improving national literacy efforts;
  • a process in support of literacy which is country-led and country-specific.
  • a support mechanism embedded in national policies and strategies; and
  • an initiative for technical support services and facilitation by UNESCO in the areas of policy, advocacy, partnership, capacity-building and innovation.

Download:Literacy Initiative For Empowerment, 2006-2015
(PDF, English, 370 kB)

Also available in Arabic and Portuguese

 

 

Adult education is a human right to be exercised by all. The case for adult learning and education corresponds to the case for lifelong learning: throughout the world, education is the indispensable foundation for creating and sustaining personal, social and economic well-being. Today, this is a lifelong and life-wide agenda both for empowerment and for the development of human resources. These two pillars bear equal weight; only together can they work effectively. Their combined impact can improve the quality of life for all citizens around the globe, generating and developing to the fullest extent the human capacities and dispositions needed to address old and new challenges – above all, those of poverty, hunger, inequality, intolerance, injustice and conflict.

 

Download: Living and learning for a viable future: the power of adult learning; Sixth International Conference on Adult Education, Belém, Brazil, 1-4 December 2009 (PDF 293 KB)

 

Also available in Arabic, Russian and Chinese

Literacy Initiative for Empowerment (LIFE, 2006–2015) was conceptualised as a key operational mechanism for achieving the goals of the United Nations Literacy Decade (UNLD, 2003–2012) and as a framework for action to accelerate efforts in countries where a lack of literacy and numeracy skills poses a critical challenge to achieving EFA, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs, 2000–2015) and the United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (DESD, 2005–2014).

LIFE targets the 36 countries with literacy rates below 50 per cent and/or a population of more than 10 million young people and adults reported to be illiterate. It is designed as a ten-year framework for national governments, NGOs, civil society, the private sector, UN agencies, and bi/multilateral development partners to collectively revitalise, enhance and advance national literacy efforts.

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Global LIFE Mid-term Evaluation Report 2006-2011: Looking Forward with LIFE - Summary (PDF 0.1 MB)

Los Pueblos indígenas y la educación de adultos en Guatemala (Indigenous Peoples and Adult Education in Guatemala)

This study aims to systematize the results of the International Survey on Adult Education for Indigenous Peoples obtained in Guatemala in 1999 by the Rigoberta Menchú Tum Foundation’s Indigenous Education Institute. This initiative was launched within the framework of the Fifth International Conference on Adult Education (CONFINTEA), which took place in Hamburg, Germany, in July 1997. During this conferences, which was also attended by representatives from indigenous groups from various world regions, recommended that an international survey be carried out to determine the basic needs and aspirations of indigenous peoples with regard to adult education.

Download: Los Pueblos indígenas y la educación de adultos en Guatemala (Indigenous Peoples and Adult Education in Guatemala) (PDF 198 KB)

 

Los Pueblos indígenas y la educación de adultos en México (Indigenous Peoples and Adult Education in Mexico)

This document systematizes the results of the International Survey on Adult Education for Indigenous Peoples, supported by the UNESCO Institute for Education (UIE) in cooperation with the Regional Cooperation Center for Adult Education in Latin America and the Caribbean (CREFAL) on behalf of Mexico. The survey was completed by 34 governmental, non-governmental and indigenous organizations in Mexico, and covered the period from May to September 1999.

Download: Los Pueblos indígenas y la educación de adultos en México (Indigenous Peoples and Adult Education in Mexico) (PDF 565 KB)

The UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning (UIL) has just published its fifth policy brief, entitled Making Large-Scale Literacy Campaigns and Programmes Work. The brief provides policymakers with a set of recommendations based on an analysis of adult literacy campaigns and programmes that took place around the world between 2000 and 2014. Despite a resurgence in the popularity of literacy campaigns as a means of mobilizing political will, resources and people, the analysis finds that most large-scale campaigns failed to achieve their overly ambitious targets. The policy brief’s key message is therefore that the literacy challenge needs to be addressed from a lifelong learning perspective. This will help policymakers to achieve the literacy target of the new global education agenda, Education 2030. Taking into account the complexity of the literacy task ahead, the policy brief recommends linking literacy campaigns to social change and mobilization; ensuring adequate investment; integrating literacy into holistic learning systems; making systematic use of technology; and improving the quality of literacy data.

LIFE is a new collaborative framework, aimed at coordinating policies, action, resources and ideas and speeding up the acquisition of literacy and basic education in all the countries most in need. It is both a strategy and an operating mechanism for the attainment of the objectives of the United Nations Literacy Decade (UNLD), Education for All (EFA) and the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) and the successful achievement of national education plans. Within this context, all countries meeting LIFE criteria (adult literacy rate less than 50% and/or over 10 million people without basic literacy skills) must immediately set to work in order to extend, accelerate and improve their literacy strategies. In this respect, LIFE in itself is neither a programme nor a project, much less a fund. On the other hand, it does offer an effective operating framework for a massive intervention and for mobilizing resources on a large scale on the basis of a new kind of partnership.

 

Download: Maputo Strategic Platform: The Literacy Initiative for Empowerment in Africa, LIFE 2006-2015 (PDF 338 KB)

The Mexico City Statement on Sustainable Learning Cities outlines the role of learning cities in achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and defines strategic directions and action points for building sustainable learning cities.

Download: Mexico City Statement on Sustainable Learning Cities

The purpose of this paper is to present a synopsis of significant experiences of innovative approaches towards achieving universal primary education (UPE) and its democratization prepared from a study of the available published materials pertaining to this field. The synopsis is based on the study of about 200 publications including books: reports of conferences, seminars and workshops; reviews; national case studies and country reports; research papers and journal articles related to UPE. Of these. A selected bibliography of about 80 publications has been compiled and Is attached to this paper as an appendix.

Download: Nonformal and alternative approaches to provide primary level education for out-of-school children: synopsis on significant experiences and innovative approaches and synthesis of six case studies with a selective bibliography (PDF 2,62 MB)